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. arrested. and in the democratic republic of congo bombed. >> and scores of cities where fast food workers striking, demanding better wages. >> but first, the united states says its still considering taking military action against syria for its use of chemical weapons. search for backing follows vote in british parliament against enter glen the ayes to the right, 272. the nos to the left, 285. >> prime minister david cameron wanted support, but despite the british parliament reaction, the u.s. is not deterred. >> the u.s. is very strong in condemning the syrian regimes use of chemical weapons, and that vote in the parliament does not change that. that's a very significant position for any nation to take publicly. we'll continue to work with britain and consult with britain as we are with all of our allies. our approach is to continue to find an international coalition that will act together, and i think you're seeing a number of countries say publicly state their position on the use of chemical weapons. we'll continue to consult with our allies and our partners and friends on this. >> rep
prominent leader is arrested and they are pulling out from the front line in their battle against the congo army. but first united states is still planning a military response to a suspected gas attack by syrian government forces. it had expected the uk to join a possible coalition but the british parliament voted against any strikes on syria as carolyn malone reports. >> reporter: the resistance outside of the white house against the u.s. attacking syria. and the leaders look at military options and an important ally is against intervening with syria with suspected use of chemical weapons and chuck hagel says the united states still hopes to act with other allies. >> our approach is to continue to find an international coalition that will act together and i think you are seeing a number of countries say publically state their position on the use of chemical weapons. >> reporter: on thursday british members of parliament voted against involvement in military action. >> the ayes to the right, 272 and nos to the left 285. [cheering] . >> reporter: there were 30 conservatives and david came
of congo, tensions are riding. >>> and a verdict is expected in the case of a minor and a fatal gang rape which has shocked the country. >> but first, th the last of the united nations' chemical weapons inspectors left syria. they drove across the border into neighboring lebanon. the 13-member team have been gathering evidence at the sites of last week's suspected chemical weapons attack. we're joined live from the crossing on the lebanon-syria record. zana, as we said, u.n. inspectors are out. they crossed into lebanon. what happens next? >> well, yes, they've crossed into lebanon. they've taken samples, evidence from rebel-controlled territories. they even visited a government hospital because according to the government some of their soldiers from exposed to gas. now they'll undergo laboratory tests, and this could take time. some are toda saying up to two . the departure could have been a sign that the west would start launching strikes against the syrian regime. but as you can see behind me we're at the main border crossing, and it's not out of the ordinary. yes, syrians are fleeing
is detained. anger in the democratic republic of congo after bombs hit homes and some say they came from rawan dshg a. a multi million dollar pay out to players suffering from injuries and we hear from a nfl star on what the settlement means to him. >> no matter what my three children will be able to go and get their education. ♪ well, the u.s. has lost britain's backing for any military intervention in syria but a possible strike remains on the table. the obama administration is still considering its options and france may be a willing partner. we will be live in paris with details in that in a moment and we go to london for a reaction of if no vote in parliament and we have this report from carolyn malone. >> reporter: a resistance outside the white house against the u.s. attacking syria. as leaders look at military options. an important ally to the uk urged against intervening in syria in reaction to the suspected use of chemical weapons. the u.s. defense chief chuck hagel says the united states still hopes to act with other allies. >> our approach is to continue to find an international
sides say they will keep fighting in the democratic republic of congo. >> the united states says it's gathering evidence ahead of possible military action against syria. the u.s. u.k. and france believe bashir al-assad used chemical weapons in the attack last week. 300 died. >> it was up of defiance. >> we're all hearing the drums of war around us. if they want to launch a war in syria, i think the pretext of chemical weapons is frail and fragile. it is a pretext. >> reporter: the u.nit would bea breach of international law. >> we hope that the american and european leaders who seek such military attacks all remarks about them have enough wisdom, especially seen that the u.n. security council has not issued permission and apparently is not going to issue any. >> reporter: an u.n. spokesman asked about this, and quick to dodge the question. >> i wouldn't speculate what military action would look like. we have no way of knowing. >> reporter: at the white house they're expressing certainty that chemical weapons were used by the assad regime and warning there will be a response. the pre
going ahead. heavy casualties reported, are being report in congo after a new round of fighting between rebels and government troops and 23 fighters attacked government-held positions on goma in the east and we have this report. >> there is a lot of heavy fights over goma and schools of civilians are caught up in it. this hospital is inundated with civilian casualties. and they have shrapnel in her leg and this is common because both sides are firing rockets and artillery at each other and this boy is daniel and four years old when a rocket landed on his house he lost his hearing. a lot of people say they don't know which side the rockets are coming from. >> i just asked god, i just need the war to stop. they destroyed our homes and killed people. i'm greatful my family have only been injured and not killed. >> reporter: there has been a large and unknown number of casualties and the captain was shot in the face. >> we fought all night, the next day in the morning the fighting intensified and i was shot. the bullet came through here and went out the back. >> reporter: this is one of the
to block a main road in the democratic congo. they are angry at the u.n. they say peace keepers should fight rebels who are just outside the city. >> the u.n. came theory defend the congolese but they need to say if they are with us or the rebts. >> the u.n. convoy has reached a roadblock. it's tense. there was confusion this week when the u.n. issued a some meant the peace keepers would be addressing others but it's tom kom and gone. some people throw rofpblgts the peacekeeper fires in the air to disperse the crowd. and the police fire tear goose clear the road and the convoy passes. >> >> a lot of people here feel like they have been constantly exploited by foreigners. are of congo's minerals being mind and now the u.n. with its foreign staff threw it in action. that's actually exploiting them too. > but the u.n. says lit secure areas one area at a time. >> we would like population to tunse that this work is gradual. we know the problems the people are serious and the situation difficult. but if the u.n. is given the time to carry out its plan, it will be satisfactory for everyone.
claimed by war and rebellion in the democratic republic of congo, and yet, the conflict there rarely makes the headlines. >> a framework for peace was signed by congo and 11 other countries this year, but it will take years to heal the scars of war. as we hear from this next report, it is women who are bearing the violence -- the brunt of the violence. >> for her, there is no worse place for women than the congo. she runs a women's shelter and a refugee camp not far from here, a small haven financed by war and a. -- four in -- foreign aid. >> women can meet here and share their stories of rape, which is often used as a weapon in war to debase women and men. >> a woman is sacred, and a man acquires is worth through a wife. some armed groups have shown us if we are strong today it is because we've raped women in villages. >> rape and sexual crimes have become the norm in a conflict that has cost millions of lives in 20 years. some two dozen armed rebel groups are in conflict with the army and each other. all want access to the region's abundance of natural resources. in goma, there is a semb
in the democratic republic of congo, and yet, the conflict there rarely makes the headlines. >> a framework for peace was signed by congo and 11 other countries this year, but it will take years to heal the scars of war. as we hear from this next report, it is women who are bearing the violence -- the brunt of the violence. >> for her, there is no worse place for women than the congo. she runs a women's shelter and a refugee camp not far from here, a small haven financed by war and a. -- four in -- foreign aid. >> women can meet here and share their stories of rape, which is often used as a weapon in war to debase women and men. >> a woman is sacred, and a man acquires is worth through a wife. some armed groups have shown us if we are strong today it is because we've raped women in villages. >> rape and sexual crimes have become the norm in a conflict that has cost millions of lives in 20 years. some two dozen armed rebel groups are in conflict with the army and each other. all want access to the region's abundance of natural resources. in goma, there is a semblance of normality, and shops
is in the republic of congo we know that in hindsight that in 1965 we were sure that he was actually there. in fact some of the documents that we look at that the cia would rank these reports once a week, they basically said che was dead. they believed he had died in the dominican republic in 1965 with a church heal uprising so they thought he was dead somewhere in the dominican republic. they were sure and that was part of the failure of our intelligence at the time. we just didn't have that network going but you're absolutely right. we thought che was in the congo which it turned out he was and we were tracking him. [inaudible] >> they were transported to the republic of congo for chasing che or whatever operation was going on. >> absolutely but again they weren't 100% sure. they believe che was there and later pictures surfaced of che in the congo but at that particular time in 1965 they weren't 100% sure. that was part of the failure of intelligence at the time so in 1967 when we believe che might ian bolivia there was disagreement between the cia the state department. they produce reports that
the brutal bus beating in florida. we'll tell you what happened and our trip to the congo, she will join us live from africa with this truly amazing stories. stick around. [ music playing ] >> well, brand-new details on a brutal school bus beating in florida. the judge sentenced the teens to indefinite probation with multiple conditions including community service, random drug tests and electronic monitoring with ankle bracelets. the boys must attend anger management classes and were told to stay away from the victim. the victim has transferred schools. she so traumatized he can't get on the bus. this is a sad story. actually the mom of one of the boys who assaulted him brock down because she hadn't seen the video before. you got a teenage son, is this appropriate punishment? >> remember this happened, a couple weeks later, the shooting in oklahoma happened with the underaged 18-year-old. then the beating of shorty in washington, walk, right, under 18. those guys are charged as adults. these kids should have been charged as aduchlt they got probation and community service for beating a kid
in the conflict again and again, in spite of congo being home to the world's largest peace force. the u.n. says these men will make a difference. it is part of a new intervention brigade with a stronger mandate that -- but they have not started operating at. earlier this week, the u.n. issued an ultimatum and said it would forcibly disarm any militia in the city of goma. there are no rebels in goma. but some thought it might be the start of a tougher approach. the and 23 rebels outside the city were clear -- the m23 rebels outside the city were clear. if the u.n. attacks, they will fight back. >> we are not a negative force. we are congolese fighting for a cause. we will fight to the very end. command backedce away from any talks of forced disarmament. there were objections in new york. ours, itperiod of 48 h is an opportunity for any persons or groups to drop the weapons. >> there are numerous rebel groups still at large, and no imminent peace deals, and still no firm action from the u.n.. the civilian population are wondering if they will ever be left in peace. al jazeera in the democratic re
in the represent of congo. rwanda has defenders, among them tony blair and bill clinton. i don't support the oppression of journalists. i don't think human rights tramped in the congo to protect the rights of rwanda. i suppose i do make more allowances for a government that has produced as much progress as they have. that is the way it is. very few situations are perfect. >> but the politics has already changed, whereas the clintons are out to win hearts and minds across africa, the united states has already opened up a new and more dangerous phase with the continent. africa is now one of the magic fronts in battle against terrorism. >> we are in a very unstable per in the word, particularly on the con tint. many of the experts i have spoken to link this to what happened in libya. libya has now become the primary source of funding and arms for al qaeda. was it a mistake to overthrow gaddafi in that manner? >> well, first of all, it doesn't work that way. there is no way that you could -- unless you thought the united states or you should do it directly, should invade the country. he was
are involved. we got to go. next on the side, dana joins us all the way live from the congo. she is giving us an update on her amazing hope and healing in africa. that's after the break. don't go away. could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. yep, everybody knows that. well, did you know some owls aren't that wise? don't forget i'm having brunch with meghan tomorrow. who? meghan, my coworker. who? seriously? you've met her like three times. who? (sighs) geico. fifteen minutes could save you...well, you know. . >> welcome back now. join us from the congo our good friend dana, the world's largest charity hospital ship. dana, how has it been? okay. it looks like she'll get it. >> all right. you got to love it. >> dana, can you hear me? >> hi. >> go ahead. tell us about your trip. >> i there tell you about my trip. i miss you all terribly. it was a long trip to get here to the congo, but it's been an amazing few days on the mercy ship. one thing i want to say so everything clears. this is not a deposit organization. everybody here is a volunteer, everyone, including all of the cre
fighting in the congo and will withdraw from the front line. >> tiger woods looks to have shaken off his back problems on the p.g.a. tour. >> a curfew is underway in egypt after another day of protest after a military takeover. our team on the ground saying neighborhoods around mosques have been sealed off by security forces. according to the health ministry, three people have been killed across the country and another 36 people reported injured. these are pictures of demonstrations taking place. these pictures show the army meanwhile, firing tear gas on anti coupe protestors in cairo. they say they will continue taking to the streets. we are live in our cairo bureau. tear gas being fired at protestors, reports that at least three people have been killed so far. are there still a lot of people out on the streets of cairo and in other parts of egypt right now? >> no, relative to the day, there aren't that many people. now we have seen two different protests, anti coup protests in cairo, one near the presidential palace. it's the first time that the area sees protests past curfew. an area
, in the democratic republic of congo, where soldiers and their families are buries those killed.
from the democratic republic of congo outside a key city. afterno >>>a australia's city p a week before a general election. >>> later in sports, former champion who wound back the clock for a sharp victory at the u.s. open. >> a teenager has been found guilty of gang-rape and murder of a woman in india last december. the 18-year-old who was a minor at the time is the first person to be convicted for the incident, which led to wide-spread uperror throughout india. the fast track court was told he was the most brutal of the six people accused in the tack. looking at this sententions, what sort of reaction is it stoking across the country? >> well, it is stoking a lot of reaction. in fact, we have been out on the streets talking about this, hearing what people have to say and some of the stuff that's really coming forward in the discussions we are having is, a lot of people thinking this sentence was just simply not strong enough, that it doesn't send a positive message about the consequences of doing such -- of committing such a crime and deterring others from going down the same path. on
are withdrawing troops from the front line. we report from the democratic republic of congo. >> hidden for 4 million years, details of an amazing discovery in greenland. ♪ theme >> the united states has lost britain's backing for any military intervention in syria, but it's not backing down. a possible strike still remains on the table. the obama administration is looking elsewhere for international support and france maybe a willing partner. we have our correspondent standing by in paris for more an that and we also have patty in washington for more on the u.s. direction and in london there's some friends. we'll talk to all three of them, first, we have this report. >> the day after a vote in the british parliament that will be talked about for many years, means the prime minister's authority has been badly damaged. >> we have to listen to parliament. they made a very clear view, which it doesn't want british involvement in military action so we will proceed on that basis. >> that this hurt britains relationship with america. >> one thing george w. bush used to say about tony blare is onc
of congo have withdrawn from their positions outside the city of goma. the group has. fighting government forces in the u.n. troops were there. these soldiers are having a good day. their enemy has withdrawn from their positions. this man says congo belongs to us. who killed their defeated. and these men say, they will send the rebels to neighboring rwanda. they believe the rebels are backed by rwanda, although rwanda denies it. the advance following heavy fighting. the u. n. has been fighting alongside the government. >> these troops are moving forward. north of the city of goma. with u.n. support, they said the rebels suffers heavy losses. >> there's no rebels here fires as a show of might. >> the u.n. says it has consistent and credible evidence that rwanda troops have enters congo and fought alongside the reasonables. den, rwanda denies it. nearby this hill top is a rebel strong hold. this telecom was destroyed in the shelling. at the pot tom of the hill is the body of a man shot dead. his arms are tied. he looked like a prisoner that was executed. both sides say the other is responsi
them no choice. the democratic of congo have been asked to disbar -- disarm. -- disband. unlike previous missions, it will have a mandate to carry out an operation. the man trying to unseat robert accused- unseat mugabe the ruling party of intimidation and ballot rigging. he said the polls did not meet international standards and were not fair. farce. has been a huge the credibility of this election has been marred by the illegal violations which affect the legitimacy of its outcome. but does not meet guidelines -- it is a sham election that does not reflect the will of the people. n independent election monitor group has also described the vote as seriously compromised. >> generally, the environment was relatively calm. based on the empirical reports from our observers, regardless of the outcome, the credibility of the 2013 harmonized election was seriously compromised by a systematic effort to disenfranchise urban voters. >> the results of mali's presidential election are expected to be announced later on this thursday. preliminary results suggest the former prime minister has
the democratic republic of congo. she says she feels more at home and is dreaming of the future in germany. >> i don't know if it's possible, but i'd like to be an actress or maybe a makeup artist. >> about her future remains uncertain. for now, she only has temporary resident status in germany. for comfort, she often reads her bible, the only possession she brought with her from kenya. >> let's get to business news now and one story causing a lot of grief in and around one german city. >> it's not something that makes for a happy summer. >> unions say it is high time for rail operators to get high. >> passengers stranded at the station -- evening traffic was paralyzed and now delays have extended to the morning commute as well. up to 40% of all trains have been canceled or rerouted. for some, delays have added almost half a day of travel time. the problems began after more than half of the stations 15 dispatchers were sick or on vacation. labor unions are up in arms after dispatchers were asked to call off vacations early. >> they have been on duty for weeks. i encourage anyone to break off the
accommodations and lives there together with jessica, herself a refugee from the democratic republic of congo. and is dreaming of the future in germany. >> i don't know if it's possible, but i'd like to be an actress or maybe a makeup artist. >> about her future remains uncertain. for now, she only has temporary resident status in germany. for comfort, she often reads her bible, the only possession she brought with her from kenya. >> let's get to business news now and one story causing a lot of grief in and around one german city. >> it's not something that makes for a happy summer. >> unions say it is high time for rail operators to get high. >> passengers stranded at the station -- evening traffic was paralyzed and now delays have extended to the morning commute as well. up to 40% of all trains have been canceled or rerouted. for some, delays have added almost half a day of travel time. the problems began after more than half of the stations 15 dispatchers were sick or on vacation. labor unions are up in arms after dispatchers were asked to call off vacations early. >> they have been on dut
and tanzania over tanzania's decision to send troops to the congo. tanzania has yet to negotiate. are fighting to bring down the congolese government. individual families are suffering. >> the authorities told me we have to share the children because my wife is tanzanian. i prefer to leave my wife and children and all my goods and properties so the children can continue their studies. >> the roll-on been authorities have set -- the rwandan authorities have set up a camp a few kilometers from the border. >> those who have families are transferred within days. the others who don't have their families remain in the camps unt il the rwandan government decides where to place them. the tanzanian >> hello and welcome to "the health show." from heart monitors to hospitals, today we're looking at how good design can save lives. coming up in the program, how scientists on opposite sides of the world are beating bacteria
of congo, witnesses say that two people were shot two and four others injured, this following a protest for lack of u.n. action and peacekeepers from uruguay allegedly fired on people but the uruguay president said that local police opened fire, not his countrymen and the u.n. is investigating? >> the united states threatens to impose more sanctions on m23 rebel leaders and their supporters if they continue fighting, this following reports of selling across one border and the state department called on rwanda to respect the drc's territorial integrity. >>> at least six dead, many more injured after the freight train they were riding on derailed in southern mexico, cargo train one of mexico's most famous, known as the beast and it had 250 migrants aboard hitching a ride towards the u.s. border. >> reporter: this train has long been the only way that many illegal migrants could hope to start a new life, nicknamed the beast meant to transport goods, but over the years many migrants have clamored onboard and used it as a vehicle to a new life in the united states but for some those dreams n
of killing protesters in congo and two were shot dead and four injured during the protest against a lack of un action and peace keepers allegedly fired on people who tried to storm the base but uraguai said they were not to blame and local police who opened fire. the un says it's investigating. meanwhile the united states is threatening to impose sanction on m-23 rebel leaders and supporters if they continue fighting. the statement followed reports of shelling across the border. hundreds of firefighters in the u.s. state of california are struggling to contain a giant blaze that reached yosemite park and it is threatening power to san francisco and melissa chan reports from just outside the park. >> lovely clouds but it's actually smoke over the mountains. this is as close to the fire line as we could get. we watched teams battle the flames both on the ground and with help from above. we are just west of yosemite park and firefighters have been trying to fight the flames but they will pull back down the road. the fire jumped the highway. steep, tough tur rain and dry conditions transform
's troops attacked rebe rebels in the democratic republic of congo. >> reporter: the governments have been fighting with the m 32 rebels since sunrise. the gunfight something heavy, they're using rocket and they're right at the front line. it's been calm for the last two days. before that it was several days of heavy fighting and now it's resumed. this time the government helding the troops with helicopters bombing opposition. they've gained some crowd from the m 23 rebels. >> police from the central africa republic have clear thousands of protesters. they escaped from rebel fighters. they were on the runway for 18 hours blocking some flights from landing. they have been in turmoil since march when rebels toppled the former president. >>> survivors in the final phase of the sri lanka government against the tiger tamils. they told of grief and disappearance of many of their family members. we have more from the northern district. >> reporter: 39 years old, a widow. life is a daily struggle to bring up a six sons, just one of whom have a job. >> they go to school, so food, cost of schooling,
republic of congo have stopped fighting after a week of escalating violence. battles between the rebel group force are focused around the eastern city. >> for more than a week now, united nations forces have been pounding rebel positions north of goma alongside soldiers of the congolese army. both sides have taken casualties. for now, m23 appears to have called a halt. thursday, a woman was killed and her infant son injured when a shell landed inside neighboring or wonder -- rwanda. this man witnessed the explosion. rwanda blamed the congolese army, accusing its neighbor of intel or the provocation. >> -- intolerable provocation. >> a line has been crossed. the point that our people are harmed is the limit. >> the u.n. and congolese military say the stray shell was fired by the rebels. the human secretary general called the rwandan president to urge restraint. have beena and uganda accused of providing covert support to the rebels, accusations they deny. rebels consist mainly of mutineers. they haveast years, had mixed fortunes. they briefly took control of goma. , leading tostalled th
where you're showing anwar congo, you're showing him talk about these horrors that he's inflicted and you were expecting it to sink in at that point and he says "josh, what i would never have worn white pants." and you think your pants wear is really not the issue here. (laughter) >> well, exactly. but the think is, anwar knows that. because in the -- the very first time i filmed anwar he takes me to a roof top where he killed hundreds and hundreds of people, shows how he did it, then says that he is a good dancer because ever since killing he's been going out drinking, taking drugs and dancing. and he starts showing how he's a good dancer. he dance it is cha-cha that on the spot where he's killed hundreds of people and to understand how he can do this i show him that footage back and he looked profoundly disturbed. and i'm sure he's disturbed about what happened on that roof. about the killing itself. but instead of saying that -- because to say that would be to admit it was wrong, which he's never been forced to do. instead he says "i should change my clothes. i should dye my ha
will of of coordinated effort to solve these problems and get in. r2p, the new un mandate and the congo which is the first time a mandate has been given to have offense of operations which are normal peacekeeping operations, yet, in the united states, the political will is going in the opposite directions. we've got sequestration. i don't know what kind of sick -- support you have gotten on this bill but i think there would be sympathetic skepticism in terms of doing anything new in anticipation of another operation and certainly not another operation on the scale of afghanistan and iraq. the question is -- how did these two political directions mesh? can the international efforts, not just the un but regional --anizations like an apricot like in africa, if the u.s. pulls back are these kinds of new initiatives and needs and lessons learning we are talking about, does it have any chance at all in moving us forward on this issue? if the u.s. pulls back, does -- how critical is the u.s. support to these kind of operations? >> great question. would provide support on a multilateral level. there
'll be in the democratic of congo where a land is feeling conflict. and remember martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech 50 years later. wvery shortly. >>> and rugby in new zealand. we'll have that story and lots more. >> egypt's acting prime minister has been speaking about hosni mubarak's release from jail. he was transferred from prison to hospital on thursday. they said that mubarak was put on house arrest to prevent unrest and prevent the president from being attacked. >>> well, anti-coup protesters in egypt defied curfew on friday. this was held in southern cairo. there are marchs in other districts. the demonstration versus shrunk in size. let's cross live now to mike hanna who is in our cairo bureau, hi again, mike, it seems that the security crackdown and the arrests of muslim brotherhood leaders and supporters have affected protest? >> well certainly yes, the size of the protest on friday, a traditional day of demonstration was muted in the course of the last 24 hours, far, far fewer numbers turned out on the streets than the organizers had hoped for. a number of reasons for this, cert
'm malcolm web, in the democratic republic of congo, where soldiers and their families are buries those killed. >> that's barn by phillips reporting for us. and now james is over at the united nations headquarters, james, and you heard what barnby was saying about the u.k. possibly going to the u.n. security council, what are you hearing from your end on that? >> well i think it is fair to say they kept this one very close to their chest. normally we get whispers of these things going on. trying to prepare these things there was no mention of this in all our calls in the last 24 hours. it is important development i think so is what we are about to see in geneva, where the special representative on syria. >> james, james -- >>ly just have to stop you, because we are crossing over to geneva, that's where the u.n. arab pane envoy is speaking. stand by and listen to this along with myself and the viewers. we expect him to speak in just a few moments. let's listen in. >> the special envoy is with you, ambassador. and he is here for -- i have to alert that for a short period of time, because
republican of congo speaks out. >>> and one of the biggest groups from turkey has its team banned. that coming up with joe a little later in sports. ♪ >>> but first the independence of south sudan in 2011 brought joy to millions, but thousands more are stranded in makeshift camps still waiting for buses to take them home. harriet martin has the story. >> reporter: once south sudan's independence looked certain, martha packed up her belongings and brought her children here. the plan was to get on a bus that would take them the thousand kilometers to south sudan where she was born. she says she thought she would be here a week. that was three years ago. she is still here waiting for that bus along with thousands of others. >> translator: we have no food. i earn about $0.50 a day doing domestic work. i'm waiting for anything to take me back. a truck, a bahs. i would even go by plane. >> reporter: when south sudan gained independence, thousands of refugees lost their citizenship rights and jobs. they were expected to leave. at first the governments of sudan and south sudan supported
away pre-registration >>> hello there. welcome back. u.n. peacekeepers in congo say they witnessed shelling into rwandan territories. it came from positions occupied by m-23 rebels, but they're blaming the congolese army for the attacks. from goma malcolm webb reports. >> reporter: these people are furious. bombs have landed in their neighborhood. one person inside was killed and eight more were injured by the blast and shrapnel. >> we don't know. we suspect it came from rwanda. we heard a blast and the whole house shattered. >> reporter: police try to calm the crowd, but they're not having it. they bring a tire to burn to start a roadblock. police collect the injured and leave. we leave with them. the injured are brought to hospital. she was so frightened by the blast doctors say she's hysterical. they try to remove shrapnel from her back. daylight comes, and there's more bombs. this time they land just over the border in neighbors rwanda killing a woman and injuring a baby. congolese soldiers and border police try to work out where the shells are coming from. this is the border w
to the congo in 1946 after she writes a book and becomes quite a public activist and in congo she is followed by british intelligence. and my five follows her around belgium and the french congo worrying she is going to go into british colonies and write these rather -- and years later they were probably scared that she done at the time -- but to write this chronicle of her travels talking about the incendiary ideas she is promoting like africans being moved by their own kin in the words of one of agents. so she lived a very large life and really forged her own political identity and her identity as a black woman in a global context and in the context of embracing an african struggle and in the context of anticolonial struggle. she had a class with -- and chinook kwame and coma and a good friend of the first prime minister of india and his sister so there was afro-indian, afro- asian solidarity which was pretty remarkable. in fact it was the sister of nehru the first woman president of the general assembly a good friend of eslanda robeson. their mother was in prison for independence activitie
. anthony bourdain, parts unknown congo next. but not energy or even my mood. that's when i talked with my doctor. he gave me some blood tests... showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% testosterone gel. the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy increases testosterone when used daily. women and children should avoid contact with application sites. discontinue androgel and call your doctor if you see unexpected signs of early puberty in a child, or signs in a woman, which may include changes in body hair or a large increase in acne, possibly due to accidental exposure. men with breast cancer or who have or might have prostate cancer, and women who are or may become pregnant or are breast-feeding, should not use androgel. serious side effects include worsening of an enlarged prostate, possible increased risk of prostate cancer, lower sperm count, swelling of ankles, feet, or body, enlarged or painful breasts, problems breathing during sleep, and blood clots in the legs. tell your doctor about your medical
about the slaughter that was taking place in rwanda or the congo. >> there are a lot of places to interve intervene. >> this is what president obama said back in 2007, and it goes back to the authority -- whether you agree or disagree, i want to talk about the hypocrisy. where he said the president doesn't have the power under the constitution to unilaterally authorize a military attack in a situation that does not involve stopping an actual or imminent threat to this country. so based on his definition, what he is going to do is unconstitutional. >> more proof that i'm right. of course the commander in chief has that power. and it's appalling that the american people would elect that man commander in chief. but that having been done, obama said, he's going to shut down guantanamo, are you sorry he didn't shut down guantanamo? i think you were right in what you said at the beginning. too late now, would have been good a few months ago. now, it's going to be like egypt again. who's going to come to power? and why didn't he intervene after the election in iran, a couple years ago
? i could get email? >> there are countries poorer than the united states including the congo and universal mail service for everybody. >> private sector, they go out of business if they lose money. your government, i have to pay forever? >> i don't represented john stossel in congress. overwhelming people don't want them closed. >> john: they are short-sighted and they want free stuff for themselves. aren't youed to be the grownup, in this case you can't have it all? >> i don't feel a moral compulsion to shut down post offices when they don't want them shut down. public disagree with you. >> john: they do. most people don't want their post office closed. >> not this one. >> it's good for convenience. >> no, i don't understand why they are still open but this one has to be. >> john: next, what you don't know about trains and mass transit. >> this thing is like ♪ ♪ ♪ >> john: now, mitd nber 2, we need government to invest in infrastructure. that does make sense. we do need ways of getting places faster and building infrastructure does create jobs. let's get moving. >> joh
this farmers are unwilling to do. >>> intense fighting continues in the democratic republic of congo. they are trying to force fighters north of the city of goma. >> reporter: there has been a lot of heavy fighting outside of goma this week. this hospital is inundated with casualties. this woman has shrapnel in her leg. this kind of wound is very common. this boy is just four years old. when a rocket landed on his house he lost his hearing. >> translator: i just ask god. i just need this war to stop. they have destroyed our homes. they have killed people. i'm grateful my family have only been injured and not killed. >> reporter: there's also been a large but still unknown number of military casualties as well. this captain was shot in the face. >> translator: we fought all night. the next day in the morning, the fighting intensified and that's when i was shot. the bullet came through here and went out the back. >> reporter: this is one of the houses that was hit, right in the middle of the city. five people were injured here, and it must have been a big rocket, because the place has
of congo after the death of a u.n. peacekeeper between rigid in clashes between rebels and in the city. they have blocked the bid behalf against sanctions -- blocked the bid for sanctions after territory vowed to defend itself in the violence against the united nations, declaring the shelling to have come from rural areas. the supreme court has rejected a challenge in presidential elections. they expressed disappointment, declaring the party will not abide by the ruling. the indian government says that the leaders of the domestic terror group blamed for the series of deadly bombings has been arrested. we have the report. it has -- >> it has been described as a breakthrough in the most wanted man being detained against security forces. the militant group that claimed responsibility in indian cities, his arrest has been hailed as a major coup for security forces. >> his arrest on the border is a huge achievement. because it was a big motivator and logistics' provider, he trained many others. >> the group was banned following a bakery bombing, an attack that appeared to target indians and
in the democratic republic of congo. this forces troops -- and eight region wrapped with violence -- in a region wrapped with violence. more than 50 people have been killed in a wave of bombings. seven people died in one of the worst instances of car bombs. the attacks came primarily in the neighborhood during rush hour. martin luther king's iconic i have a dream speech, president obama is set to get an address from the same spot in washington. kings march for jobs and freedom is considered the moment that calls for reforms. >> back in 1963, 250 thousand people came to washington to hear martin luther king demand equality for black americans. >> i have a dream. -- that my four little children will one day live in a nation what they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream. >> it wrapped -- it was a turning point for the civil rights movement putting it on the national agenda. less than a year later, lyndon b. johnson signed the civil rights act which outlined segregation. thousands of marchers converged on washington, d.c. commemorating
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